Uber won a partial victory when a judge granted it a short operating licence in London after its permit was not renewed over safety concerns, but the taxi-hailing app came under criticism.

The company conceded Transport for London (TfL) was correct in its September decision, but told an appeal hearing at Westminster Magistrates' Court that "wholesale" reforms mean its licence should be restored.

On Tuesday (June 26), Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot granted a 15-month licence, but criticised the firm for its past behaviour as aiming to "grow the business, come what may".

She also ordered the Silicon Valley giant to pay TfL's £425,000 legal costs.

The firm had its application for a five-year licence rejected in September, but dropped its request to 15 months during the appeal hearings and agreed to certain conditions.

Tom Elvidge, general manager of Uber in the UK, said: "We are pleased with today's decision. We will continue to work with TfL to address their concerns and earn their trust, while providing the best possible service for our customers."

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said: "I fully supported Transport for London's decision not to renew Uber's operating licence last September - I believe everyone must play by the same rules, no matter how big or powerful they are.

"After years of operating poorly in London, Uber has now accepted that TfL's action in refusing to renew their licence was totally justified. Today our stance has been vindicated by the court.

"Uber has been put on probation - their 15 month licence has a clear set of conditions that TfL will thoroughly monitor and enforce.

Uber is on a 15-month operating licence in London, granted by a judge

"As a result of us standing up for Londoners, Uber has been forced to overhaul the way it operates not just in London but across the world, including completely changing its global governance structures and implementing new systems for reporting alleged crimes.

"As mayor, I'm working to ensure that London continues to be at the forefront of innovation and a natural home for new and exciting companies. But no matter how powerful and how big you are, you must play by the rules."