Campaigners showed their love for the NHS by presenting a Valentine's card to staff at West Middlesex Hospital .

More than 100 people signed the card, which was delivered to the hospital in Twickenham Road, Isleworth , on Valentine's Day (February 14).

The stunt was part of the national campaign 999 Call For The NHS, which was set up to show support for junior doctors and opposition to privatisation of the public health service.

Natasha Read, who lives in Isleworth and had her son Leo Tierney at the hospital, created the card for West Middlesex Hospital.

Natasha Read presents the Valentine's card at West Middlesex Hospital with Leo Tierney, four, and Roric Betts, five, who were both born at the hospital

She visited Brentford Market with fellow campaigners on the morning of Valentine's Day, where they collected 100-150 messages for the card, before presenting it to an A&E consultant at the hospital that afternoon.

"I thought it would be nice to give local staff a bit of a boost because I can imagine morale's pretty low at the moment," said Ms Read.

'I can imagine morale's pretty low at the moment'

"The public reaction was incredible. The card was so full I could barely fit my own message on.

"Everyone we spoke to was fully in support of keeping the NHS public and of fair and safe contracts for junior doctors. I just wish the Government would listen to the public."

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt last week confirmed a seven-day contract would be imposed upon junior doctors after the government failed to reach an agreement with union leaders.

Some of the messages of support in the Valentine's card which was delivered to West Middlesex Hospital

The British Medical Association (BMA), which has taken industrial action over the measure , argues the new deal could lead to doctors working longer hours and a reduction in their overall pay.

But Mr Hunt claims it will improve healthcare outside of normal working hours and insists no junior doctor will be worse off, due to an 11% increase in basic pay.