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What you need to know about Sadiq Khan's Ultra Low Emission Zones plans to charge older, polluting vehicles

getwestlondon explains the key details of the Mayor's plans which hope to reduce harmful N02 pollution

Sadiq Khan has announced bold plans to tackle London's "pollution problem", with his Ultra Low Emission Zone proposals to begin a year early in 2019.

The Mayor of London's second consultation on cleaning up the city's air began this week (October 11). It includes plans to seek views on charging older, more polluting vehicles in central London - known as the "T-charge".

Launching the new consultation whilst visiting St Saviour’s and St Olave’s Church of England Secondary School in Southwark, an area affected by traffic pollution, Mr Khan said he is "determined to help every Londoner breathe cleaner air".

Sadiq Khan said: "Toxic air in London is a health emergency that requires bold action, including introducing charges for older polluting vehicles and expanding the ULEZ.

"After the massive response to my first consultation I now need the public to let me know their views on my detailed proposals to help clean-up our filthy air."

His statement comes after a scathing attack on former Mayor Boris Johnson who Mr Khan said was "too slow on the issue" and "only responded in an emergency".

London could introduce world's highest emissions charge for older cars in new air quality crackdown

Alex Williams, Transport for London’s Managing Director of Planning, said: "The Mayor has asked us to set out in detail and seek views on a range of proposals that will have a significant impact in reducing pollution in the capital.

"We think these ambitious proposals show London is taking the lead globally in tackling one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century.

"I would urge as many people as possible to respond to the consultation to help us shape our plans."

It is estimated that around 9,400 premature deaths occur each year in London due to illnesses caused by long-term exposure to air pollution and 448 schools in London are in areas exceeding legal air quality levels.

Diesel vehicles are recognised as a major contributor to pollution and associated health impacts in London and the Mayor wants to phase out these vehicles from the bus, taxi and other fleets.

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