Video thumbnail, Temperatures set to drop as UK braces for 'Snowvember'
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The UK could be hit by severe blizzards this weekend alongside torrential rain and temperatures as cold as -3C, forecasters have warned.

But the warning comes as our freakish weather hit new heights last night - as the record for the warmest November night EVER was broken.

The temperature did not drop below 16.1C in Murlough, Co. Down, Northern Ireland - breaking the previous record of 15.9C.

However, elsewhere in the UK, the Environment Agency has issued three 'red' flood warnings and 28 'amber' flood alerts.

And the Met Office has issued yellow warnings of severe weather for large parts of Scotland and the North of England.

Downpours left motorists stranded waist-deep in swirling floodwater, with a man reported missing in Kendal, Cumbria, last night after a car plunged into the River Kent.

Weather charts show a high risk of snow across Scotland this weekend with flurries possible as far south as Wales.

Overnight temperatures in the north will sink to -3C while hovering in single figures by day although the south will hang on to milder 14Cs and 15Cs.

Chaos: Snow covers a car on the B3139 near to the village of West Horrington, near Wells on January 23, 2013 in Somerset, England
Chaos: Snow covers a car on the B3139 near to the village of West Horrington, near Wells on January 23, 2013 in Somerset, England

James Madden, forecaster for Exacta Weather, said: "The first wintry blast is likely to develop to develop towards the end of the week as we see a reversion to some much cooler weather than of late from the north of the country.

"It is likely to bring some snow across higher ground and potential blizzard conditions in the north with the accompanying and strengthening winds, and there may even be the potential for some wintry showers in some well elevated levels in parts of northern England.

"Some exceptional winds could also be registered within parts of the north and west from the stormy weather within this period."

The mild conditions are being caused by warm winds from the Azores and have also been linked to the el Nino weather phenomenon.