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London must adapt and move forward to emerge from Brexit successfully, says Sadiq Khan

The Labour Mayor said the city shouldn't look backwards, but focus on how it responds to the referendum

London must not look backwards where Brexit is concerned, but focus on the city's future, Sadiq Khan urges.

In a speech made at Lloyd's annual dinner on Monday (September 5), the Mayor said the British people's vote must be respected and London must move on in order to tackle what is to come.

He told the audience: "The people have expressed their democratic will.

"And as tempting as it might be, I’m not going to use this speech as a platform to criticise the Leave campaign or the senior politicians who were involved in getting us where we are today.

The Mayor of London gave a speech at the annual Llloyds of London dinner on Monday September 5

"Because we are where we are.

"And what’s important now is that rather than looking backwards, we focus on how we respond, adapt and move forward with the confidence befitting our great city."

London closer than ever to get a say in Brexit negotiations

Mr Khan emphasised he will do his utmost to ensure London gets a good deal when Brexit negotiations begin.

And he said the country should not be lulled into a false sense of security that Britain has avoided a post-Brexit crisis.

The Mayor added he will be working with the government to put in place new initiatives to boost jobs, growth and investment to "mitigate against the potential long fallout of Brexit."

He told diners: "This will be my approach: In London's corner to protect our competitiveness.

"And actively fighting in the ring to advance our city ever forward, making it better for all Londoners."

The referendum result showed the Capital voting to stay in by a landslide majority .

The after effects of the decision is still being debated, with businesses such as Vodafone in Paddington considering relocation .

In a summit held on Tuesday (June 28), Mr Khan addressed business leaders and said London needed more powers "right now" to protect the city from economical downturns.

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