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Diabetes sufferers celebrating Diwali urged to balance good foods over bad

Diabetes UK issue advice and tips on getting through the five-day festival at less risk to health

Celebrating Diwali (Image: Diabetes UK)

Hindus, Sikhs and Jains with diabetes are being urged to balance good foods over bad with the five-day Diwali festival underway, from Monday (Nov 9).

Diabetes UK has issued advice to stay active and eat in moderation as the festival of lights is a haven for foods often high in fat and sugar such as barfi (sweet food) and fried foods including samosas.

An expert from the charity has said the best thing for people with the condition is to plan healthy meals throughout the day, so a small portion of sweet treats can also be enjoyed.

Celebrations started on Monday (Nov 9) and will continue throughout the week with Diwali (festival of lights) being celebrated on Wednesday (Nov 11) and the Hindu New Year on Thursday (Nov 12).

In Hounslow many people have the condition, and a recent series of roadshows revealed hundreds more residents were found to be at risk of Type 2 diabetes.

A recent study also showed Harrow had the highest percentage of Type 2 diabetes risk in England.

"The other important thing to remember is to stay active"

Krishna Sarda, engaging communities manager at Diabetes UK, said: “People with diabetes can enjoy small amounts of these festive foods if they plan ahead and fit it around a healthy balanced diet.

“Throughout the day, it’s best to eat healthier foods such as fruit and vegetables, wholegrain basmati rice, chickpeas and dhal.

"These types of foods can help keep your blood glucose levels more stable during the celebrations, but keep an eye on your portions.

"The other important thing to remember is to stay active, as this will help you to manage your blood glucose levels.

"If you have a blood testing monitor, don’t forget to test your blood glucose levels more during the festivities and before every meal to make sure they don’t get too high.

One or two high blood glucose readings should not affect long-term diabetes control, but people should aim to avoid persistently high readings."

For more information visit www.diabetes.org.uk or call Diabetes UK Careline on 0345 123 2399.

TIPS:

Replace ghee with vegetable oil

Use spices and herbs instead of salt

Replace sugar with artificial sweeteners

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